Digital Marketing Consultant - Good Stuff Communications

How We Wrecked The Ocean

This talk underscores the systemic damage that we have done to the ocean. The oil spill is an example of the destruction we have wrought, but it’s only one example. It’s the one that we are focusing on (rightfully so), but it is merely the latest in a series of harmful things that we have done. We simply cannot simply continue treating the environment as though the resources we can extract are limitless. They most certainly are not. Food for thought.

3 Responses to How We Wrecked The Ocean

  1. What a powerful series you've put together here, Zack. I wanted to leave a few (but lengthy) comments.

    1. We consumers have some power to change this – buy sustainably caught fish! Keep this list in your wallet and shop responsibly: http://www.fishonline.org/information/MCSPocket

    2. I thought it might be worth looking at some successful efforts to fixing these problems. Here are two:
    a. Conservation efforts do work. Here is an article about the rebounding blue whale population in the BBC: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science_and_environm….
    b. People are starting to look at some more systemic solutions. Here is an article about the success of some marine reserves and how they are looking at creating networks and involving stakeholders to increase the impact of these reserves on the health of the oceans: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/10….

    3. I am amazed by how those people manage to sustain themselves while they devote their lives to finding solutions to the seemingly hopeless plight of the oceans and all that live in it. I am already overcome with sadness and desperation after hearing just 20-minute snippets of what they know.

    4. Here's another movie about pollock in the Bering Sea: http://vimeo.com/2506485

  2. Thanks Myra!

    Great resources. I hadn't seen the sustainable fishing list – I don't eat much fish, but if I did, I would put it in my wallet!

    It would be interesting to learn more about why the blue whales are rebounding – sometimes “protection” doesn't result in the species beginning to thrive again. I am, no matter how it is happening, glad to see that blue whales are increasing in number.

    The approach outlined in the Science Daily article that you shared seems to be the only way that we can truly begin to repair the damage we have done – slowly, collaboratively, and systemically.

    I hear you on being overcome with emotion, it is pretty depressing. The elephant in the room (as always) is our population size and treating our ecosystem resources (like fish) as though they are limitless.

    I recommend The Cove for more sobering oceanic reality. It's a film about the whaling and dolphin industry in Japan. It is pretty shocking, but also worth watching to be aware of the impact of our need to watch whales and dolphins in captivity.

  3. Thanks Myra!

    Great resources. I hadn't seen the sustainable fishing list – I don't eat much fish, but if I did, I would put it in my wallet!

    It would be interesting to learn more about why the blue whales are rebounding – sometimes “protection” doesn't result in the species beginning to thrive again. I am, no matter how it is happening, glad to see that blue whales are increasing in number.

    The approach outlined in the Science Daily article that you shared seems to be the only way that we can truly begin to repair the damage we have done – slowly, collaboratively, and systemically.

    I hear you on being overcome with emotion, it is pretty depressing. The elephant in the room (as always) is our population size and treating our ecosystem resources (like fish) as though they are limitless.

    I recommend The Cove for more sobering oceanic reality. It's a film about the whaling and dolphin industry in Japan. It is pretty shocking, but also worth watching to be aware of the impact of our need to watch whales and dolphins in captivity.

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